April 19, 2019

Communication: The Bridge to a Healthy Relationship

    Earlier this week, the Hong Kong entertainment industry was shaken by the scandal of one of their male artists who was seen acting inappropriately […]
April 12, 2019

Toxic Positivity: Not All That’s Good, Is Good

We’ve all had bad days and difficult periods in our lives. When a loved one such as a friend or family member is going through something […]
April 4, 2019

Millenial Burnout: Are We Just “Snowflakes”?

We were told that the world today is safer and more secured than in the past; We were told that opportunities now are aplenty and we […]

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Earlier this week, the Hong Kong entertainment industry was shaken by the scandal of one of their male artists who was seen acting inappropriately with another woman. Upon hearing the news, the wife of the male artist, who herself is a singer, came out with a press statement that touched the hearts of many fans and netizens. “Embracing each other’s mistakes“ and “mutual forgiveness” is essential in a healthy relationship apart from giving each other the “feeling of happiness and warmth”. She has announced that she has already forgiven her husband and takes this incident as “a lesson in their relationship”. The wife has shown plenty of emotional maturity when faced with situations that threaten to put a strain to the relationship between her and her husband. Perhaps behind the flurry of paparazzi and newscasters, the both of them have taken the time to talk about the issue up front instead of sweeping it under the carpet. Open communication is essential in finding the right balance for a healthy relationship. Speaking up and discussing problems with your partner is a healthy way to resolve conflicts while maintaining mutual respect for each other. Avoiding and putting off talking about the issue is like a ticking time bomb that will put even more strain on the relationship. Talking to a therapist can also help if the issue at hand requires a third person perspective and input. For more information on healthy relationships you may refer to: https://www.loveisrespect.org/healthy-relationships/Photo credits: https://www.pexels.com/photo/man-and-woman-standing-side-by-side-1638108/
We were told that the world today is safer and more secure than in the past;We were told that opportunities now are aplenty and we can afford to “chase our dreams”;We were told that we have more time and energy now to achieve more things in life.“But there’s so much to do I don’t’ feel like doing anything.”“But my friends and family members are doing way better than me. Am I working hard enough?”“But what am I actually trying to achieve in life?”Dear millennials, this is an article dedicated to you.By now, we have all become young adults ready to take on the world, or in our millennial lingo, we are ready to do some “adulting”. Indeed there are plenty of opportunities for us now compared to back then. Finding a job, applying for postgraduate studies, and basically do a lot of stuff independently; that’s what is “expected” of us by societal standards. And the boom of social media in our generation means we are constantly connected with people on platforms like Facebook and Instagram. We’re bound to come across posts by our peers when they’ve gotten somewhere in their lives. Because of this, we are pressured by society to feel like we need to be constantly “doing” stuff in order to be considered “successful”, which will eventually leave us feeling drained for days or even months consecutively. Often times we may find ourselves so exhausted and burnt out, we put off even the simplest of chores like putting our laundry away, just because “we can’t”. This is known as “errand paralysis”.Millennial burnout is real and it has a profound effect on our mental health. Like generations before us with their own struggles, this is the struggle of our generation. It helps to talk about this with our peers to understand that we are together in this and that this is not a typical “millennial snowflake” issue as labelled by other generations.Written by: A fellow millennial. (Hwu Ning)Resources:https://www.bbc.co.uk/bbcthree/article/c384d54a-0116-437f-83e8-ddbca65b6c06https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/annehelenpetersen/millennials-burnout-generation-debt-workArtwork: Gemma Correll

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